CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Indians will abandon the use of the Chief Wahoo logo ahead of the 2019 season, Major League Baseball and the organization said in a statement released to The New York Times on Monday.

First utilized on Cleveland’s uniforms in 1948, the Chief Wahoo logo has brought out passion from both sides of the debate, including from MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred, who cited the need for “diversity and inclusion” in the statement announcing the elimination of on-field use of the logo.

WKYC reporter Jasmine Monroe visited with a member of the American Indian movement of Ohio who's Progressive field isn't so Progressive. The group while this is a step in the right direction, it's just not enough.

Watch the full interview in the player below:

Protestors voice their opinion about Cleveland Indians mascot Chief Wahoo outside Progressive Field prior to the game between the Cleveland Indians and the Minnesota Twins on April 4, 2014 in Cleveland, Ohio.

The reaction on social media has been swift, with people on both sides of the debate.

There are those who believe the move to abandon Chief Wahoo is long overdue.

Here is a detailed view of the Chief Wahoo logo on a Cleveland Indians baseball hat during photo day at Goodyear Ballpark.

And then, there are those who believe Chief Wahoo was not a racist depiction of Native Americans and should remain one of the team’s official logos.

The Indians are set to host the MLB All-Star Game at Progressive Field in 2019, and while the caricature will remain on items for sale in the team shop and stores around the Cleveland area, it will not be anywhere on the field or signage in and around the stadium.

The Indians will retain the trademark of Chief Wahoo.