Urban Meyer likely expected some of the criticism he's received via Twitter, from Ohio State Buckeyes fans and some college football analysts (including USA TODAY Sports' George Schroeder) for sticking with J.T. Barrett as his starting quarterback after OSU's loss to Oklahoma. (Meyer said Saturday night after the game that he will not consider a quarterback change.)

But second-guessing from Ohio State's verbal commitments and recruiting targets? Yep, that's happening.

Freshman Dwayne Haskins and redshirt sophomore Joe Burrow are Barrett's backups.

More from theathletic.com's Ari Wasserman about Tweets from the high school players, including top offensive lineman Jack Carman from Fairfield High School, offered by Ohio State in late 2015:

First, five-star defensive end Micah Parsons of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, posted from Ohio State's 31-16 loss to Oklahoma that if he were the coach he'd make a change at quarterback and replace Barrett with Haskins. Given he was on his official visit and at the game, it seemed inappropriate.

Meyer was asked generally if something like that could have an impact if a recruit stays on his recruiting board. Meyer isn't allowed to comment on specific recruits per NCAA rules, but he knew what the question was about.

“Sure,” Meyer said. “I was made aware of something and I let other people … I was made aware of it.”

Meyer seemed like he was going to take a step further on it, but he pulled back. That makes sense given recruiting is always in flux and he might not have been 100 percent aware of how Mark Pantoni and the rest of his staff had handled the situation.

Parsons, the No. 1 weakside defensive end in the 2018 class, later apologized for it because it's something he probably shouldn't have said. Whether you agree with him or not — and most of you probably do — it's not good form to disrespect the quarterback of the team that's hosting you.

But here's where it gets weird: Even after he apologized, five-star offensive tackle Jackson Carman of Fairfield, Ohio — Ohio State's top-remaining 2018 target — echoed Parson's original sentiment. Then Parsons retweeted it and said “It's becoming a trend,” basically ignoring that he had just apologized.

Here are some of the Tweets: