Wait until you see how easy it is to steal your identity.

Danielle Serino- mail fraud

"You feel like a victim every day."

If there was a poster child for identity theft. It would be this woman.

Violated so many times, she and her husband are scared to show their identity.

"Probably about a dozen times all together," she said.

It's not that they're not careful.

"We're very careful. We're going on vacation. We notify our neighbors, we notify the bank, we notify the police department,” she said.

So imagine their shock, when after their home flooded and they had to temporarily move, they went to the post office to change their address, and no one asked them for ID.

"Isn't it scary that you can go into the post office and change...that is bizarre so crazy," she said.

We thought it had to be a fluke so we tried it ourselves, at not one, but two different post office's.

"So, no ID no nothing? I can come in and say it's me, I asked.

"That's happened in the past," said the postal worker.

At the second post office I asked "Well what if I am a thief and came in here?"

“Somebody did. They changed Mr. (sic)  address. He didn't even know. They opened up a Sam's Club card," the postal worker said.

Yet this is the post office's policy. The only time you have to show I.D. is if you change your address online.

"Well what kind of ID do I show online?" I asked.

"Credit card number online and they charge you a dollar," she said.

But a thief probably has a stolen credit card as well or one with a P.O. box address that won't be tracked down. Our poster children learned that when they called the police after a credit card was opened in their name.

"I said well can't you go watch the mailbox for when the credit card shows up and they said they doubt they even live there."

Now the post office does send a confirmation that you requested the change, but what if, as thieves often do, stake out your mailbox and steal the letter?

We were told in an email from the Post Office that "The instances of fraudulent change of address orders is serious but rare.” And that the forms clearly state that "anyone submitting false or inaccurate information...is subject to punishment by fine or imprisonment..."

But for a couple who's yet to see ONE of their thieves brought to justice...that ‘aint cutting it.

"Typical government entity," the couple said.

Now here's what's just as troubling about this story. When I suggested to the spokesperson for the Post Office that we could turn this into a positive story...I was thinking perhaps we could change the policy to protect people…he said quote "the provided statement speaks for itself."

© 2017 WKYC-TV


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