Local trumpet player and soldier partner to help veterans

Music helps tell soldier's story of struggle

CLEVELAND - A song led a trumpet player to a soldier. That song is "Soldier's Things" by Tom Waits. Both men are from Northeast Ohio, but they want to help veterans all over the world by bringing music and a story together.

"That is very much, kind of, what this collaboration is,” said Jaymes Poling.  “An effort to bring together a very important story and a very important message and music."

A trumpet player, Dominick Farinacci, and a soldier, Jaymes Poling, decided to bring their worlds together.  Poling spent eight years in the military.  He served three of those years in Afghanistan.

“There is a transition period for most of us, but most of us get through that to accomplish great things in whatever field we are hoping to do that in and that is the story we are hoping to share here,” said Poling.

Farinacci and Poling launched this music video in the summer.  By 2018, they hope to turn this into an on-stage production and bring it around the world.

"I am writing and tying my story in as Dominick takes my story and writes music around that,” said Poling.

“On my side, I am going to bring together all kinds of great artists,” said Farinacci. “Great gospel and RMB.  Blues and jazz artists.  Great vocalists.  Great world music artists and, on Jaymes’ side, he is going to bring together a group of veterans.  We want the artists and veterans to really engage in a creative process to bring this story to life."

"I think a lot of civilians see the veteran experience as something they cannot understand, and they just leave it there,” said Poling.  “What we are hoping to do is push a little further through that.”

Farinacci and Poling say it is not just about the finished product.  Instead, they want the community to follow along with them on this quest to help veterans and their families all around the world.

“On Kickstarter, we are giving people the opportunity to come along with us through the production process right,” said Farinacci.  “Take people from Day 1 to the final day."

“Initially, it started for me to get veterans to talk to each other, but almost immediately I started seeing the impact on families,” said Poling.  “Mothers, wives, children of World War II vets, spanning all conflicts coming forward and saying this project helped me understand my loved one that I have not until now."

If you are interested in finding out more about their project, visit their page on Kickstarter.


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