SHARECOMMENTMORE

Unsettled weather continued in the East on Sunday as a strong cold front with waves of low pressure reached across the Eastern Valleys.

Deep moisture from the Gulf of Mexico interacted with this disturbance through the day and kicked up bands of moderate to heavy rain and areas of thunderstorms near the boundary from the Lower Mississippi Valley through the lower Ohio Valley and the Tennessee Valley.

Rainfall totals from this disturbance were expected to range from 1 to 2 inches, with isolated areas surpassing 3 inches across the Midwest and Deep South. Minor flooding and flash flooding remained a concern for these areas as many streams and creeks experienced high flows.

Meanwhile, ahead of the cold front, conditions remained quite balmy for this time of year as daytime highs in the eastern third of the nation remained 15 to 25 degrees above seasonable averages. Daytime highs ranged from the 40s and 50s in parts of Lower New England this afternoon and reached into the 60s and 70s across the Mid-Atlantic states.

As temperatures warmed ahead of the cold front, areas behind the disturbance experienced much colder conditions today than yesterday as temperatures returned to near normal values with the passing of this disturbance.

In the West, chilly and dry conditions continued under generally fair skies on Sunday. Daytime highs across the region ranged from the 40s and 50s in Southern California to sub-zero temperatures in the interior of the Intermountain West.

SUNDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................90 Corpus Christi NAS, Texas

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................87 Salt Point, La.

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................-38 West Yellowstone, Mont.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-44 Alamosa, Colo.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................76 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................3.63 Monticello, Ark.

ON THIS DATE....... In the first part of 1952, the Sierra Nevada mountains saw many strong winter snow storms. This was unfortunate for the Southern Pacific Railroad, as these mountains were an obstacle that needed to be traversed. Finally, on this date in 1952, a train titled "Streamliner City" set off over the Sierras only to be trapped by an avalanche. It would take three days to free the 226 passengers.

SHARECOMMENTMORE