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Cold temperatures for the northeastern quadrant of the nation, a continued lake effect snow event downwind of the Great Lakes, and accumulating snow near the New England coast remained the top weather headlines of the nation on Tuesday.

For the northeastern quarter of the nation, persistent northwesterly flow maintained frigid daytime temperatures on Tuesday. Highs across the region ranged from below zero in parts of the Dakotas and Upper Mississippi Valley to the single digits in the Upper Great Lakes and interior Northeast to the 30s across parts of the Lower Ohio Valley and New England.

Bitterly cold temperatures combined with northwest winds of 10 to 15 mph and higher gusts led to dangerously cold wind chills during the morning and nighttime hours across parts of the Dakotas through the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley and into parts of the Central Appalachians.

Meanwhile, in addition to seeing some of the coldest temperatures and wind chills of the season, a significant lake effect snow event continued downwind of the Great Lakes. Snow accumulations were expected to be fairly heavy in immediate downwind areas-including western Michigan and areas from northeastern Ohio through the lakeshore areas of upstate New York through Tuesday.

Another 2 to 4 inches of snow were anticipated in areas of western Michigan by Tuesday morning, while another 6 to 12 inches were expected from areas of northeastern Ohio through the lakeshore areas of upstate New York, leading to storm totals of 1 to 3 feet in the most persistent lake snows by Tuesday evening.

As of this afternoon, some of the higher 24-hr snow totals were reported from Oswego County, New York where snow totals ranged from 3.0 inches at W. Fulton to 32.0 inches at Bennetts Bridge. Geauga County, Ohio and Erie County, Pennsylvania also reported relatively high 24-hr snow total reports of up to 13.0 and 10.8 inches respectively.

Shifting farther east, accumulating snows developed along portions of the New England coast through Tuesday's morning commute. Six to 12 inches of snowfall were anticipated for portions of southeast New England, from parts of eastern Massachusetts and Connecticut through Rhode Island, and eastern Maine.

Some of this morning's higher snow totals in southeastern New England included 5.0 inches in South Kingston, Rhode Island and 6.2 inches in Edgartown, Massachusetts.

Elsewhere, outside of a few light showers in the Florida Peninsula, it was a quiet weather day across the rest of the nation as high pressure remained dominant in the West.

TUESDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................82 Camp Pendleton, Calif.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F).......................... ,

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................-34 Crane Lake, Minn.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-51 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................59 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................0.62 Port Heiden, Alaska

ON THIS DATE....... A Chinook wind can have a dramatic effect on local weather. On this date in 1943, the temperature at Spearfish S.D. rose from -4 degrees to 45 degrees in just two minutes due to a strong Chinook wind. This represented the most dramatic temperature rise in word weather records. Later that day, the temperature plunged from 54 degrees to -4 degrees in just 27 minutes.

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