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More frigid air flowed into the northern portion of the country Wednesday, bringing starkly cold temperatures.

Temperatures as low as -34 degrees were noted in parts of the Northeast, while areas of the Northern Plains and Minnesota struggled to reach 0 degrees in the afternoon. Elsewhere, afternoon temperatures in the 30s were noted as far south as Kentucky and northern North Carolina.

Along with the cold air, lake effect snow continues downwind of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario, but this snow was not as intense as the past few days and gradually diminished throughout the day.

Meanwhile, a Pacific storm slammed into the West Coast, bringing rain and high elevation snow from Washington through central California. This precipitation was expected to move eastward into the afternoon and evening, ushering in more wet weather to the West. This wet weather will move into the Great Basin and Rockies on Thursday.

The Northeast could only manage temperatures from the -0s through 20s, while the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest saw similar temperatures. The Southeast saw a range of temperatures from the 40s to the 70s, while the Southern Plains rose into the 60s and 70s.

WEDNESDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................80 Brownsville, Texas

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................81 Brownsville, Texas

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................-34 Mt. Washington, N.H.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-85 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................82 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................1.27 Crescent City, Calif.

ON THIS DATE....... As an old song says, it never rains in Southern California. Well, on this date in 1943, Hoegees Camp in the San Gabriel Mountains set a 24-hour state precipitation record when it received 26.12 inches of rain.

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