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Showers and thunderstorms continued across Florida on Thursday, while snow showers developed from the Great Lakes through the Central High Plains.

A low pressure system moved eastward from the Northern Plains and Upper Midwest. This system pushed a warm front eastward through the Great Lakes, while two cold fronts trailed behind the system. One frontal boundary brought scattered snow showers to the Mid-Mississippi River Valley and stretched westward into Nebraska and eastern Colorado, while the other extended from Wisconsin into South Dakota.

These systems produced widespread scattered snow showers throughout the day, with 1 to 3 inches reported in most areas. Strong winds developed along these frontal boundaries that stretched across the Plains. Strongest winds were reported at Philip, S.D., with sustained winds over 40 mph gusts up to 54 mph.

In the South, the tail end of a cold front lingers over Florida, which continued to produce heavy rainfall and strong thunderstorms throughout the day. Severe storms have not yet been reported, but this system has a history of damaging winds and large hail.

In the West, a trough of low pressure in the Gulf of Alaska moved into British Columbia and pushed the tail end of a warm front into northern Washington. This kicked up a few scattered rain and high elevation snow showers, but heavy precipitation was not anticipated.

THURSDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................87 Kendall, Fla.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................91 Marathon, Fla.

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................1 Hallock, Minn.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-52 Kuparuk, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................58 Winner, S.D.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................1.22 Madison, S.D.

ON THIS DATE....... It was a white St. Valentine's Day along the Gulf Coast in 1895. Rayne, La., received 22 inches of snow to set a state record for the most snowfall ever. Records were also set in Houston, Texas (2 inches); Galveston, Texas (15.4 inches); Brownsville, Texas, (6 inches); and Mobile, Ala. (6 inches).

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