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Wintry precipitation and windy weather conditions continued from parts of the North-Central U.S. into the Midwest on Monday as a winter storm remained dominant across the region.

Swaths of accumulating snowfall along with strong, gusty winds persisted in eastern Montana, the Dakotas and Upper Mississippi River Valley and spread southeastward into the Mid-Mississippi and western Ohio River Valleys through the afternoon.

Areas of north-central North Dakota and eastern Montana experienced the brunt of this precipitation through the morning and early afternoon and reported snow totals of up to 1 and 2 feet respectively.

Snow accumulation in eastern North Dakota, western and southern Minnesota, and portions of Iowa were expected to range from 8-12 inches through Tuesday with isolated higher amounts of 12-18 inches. Snow totals of up to 8 inches were anticipated in surrounding areas of the region.

In addition to snow, strong winds accompanying this system created periods of blowing and drifting snow events, resulting in reduced visibility and hazardous travel conditions. Thus far, snow drifts as high as 3 feet have been reported in Crosby, North Dakota.

Meanwhile, outside of the North-Central U.S., an associated cold front kicked up strong winds and continued moderate snow showers in the Colorado Rockies.

Elsewhere, low pressure located off the northern New England coast maintained snow showers and lake enhanced snow showers in the northern Northeast and downwind of Lake Ontario.

MONDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................93 Falfurrias, Texas

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................80 Brownsville, Texas

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................-9 Yellowstone, Wyo.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-51 Nuiqsut, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................64 Mt. Washington, N.H.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................1.48 Cavalier, N.D.

ON THIS DATE....... Fair weather was forecast by the U.S. Weather Bureau on this date in 1909 for President Taft's Inauguration. Instead, the nation's capital received 9.8 inches of snow as a massive snowstorm hit the city. This forecasting error led to great criticism of the Weather Bureau.

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