LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

Shower and thunderstorm activity persisted across the South on Saturday, as a trough of low pressure moved eastward from the Southern Plains and into the Tennessee Valley.

Flow around this system pulled in abundant moisture and energy from the Gulf of Mexico, which allowed for strong thunderstorms with periods of heavy rainfall and strong winds. Severe thunderstorms were possible in these areas, with main threats of hail, strong winds, and possibly a few tornadoes. However, severe thunderstorms have not yet been reported.

This system has a history of producing quarter size hail and wind gusts over 60 mph. Most areas across the Mid- and Lower Mississippi River Valley and into the Tennessee Valley saw 1 to 2 inches of rain, while heaviest rainfall was reported at Jackson, Tenn., with a midday total of 2.11 inches. Throughout the day, showers and thunderstorms from this system advanced eastward into the Ohio River Valley, which allowed for flooding to remain of concern for the region.

The back side of this system created a cold front that stretched across Texas, which also kicked up showers and thunderstorms. Severe storms have not yet developed in these areas but were likely due to ample moisture and energy from the Gulf of Mexico.

In the West, a series of disturbances moved through the Pacific Northwest as a system moved through western Canada. This allowed for rain showers to develop across Washington, which moved into the Northern Rockies into the afternoon and evening hours.

SATURDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................97 Thermal, Calif.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................97 Harlingen, Texas

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................18 Leadville, Colo.

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................-30 Deadhorse, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................53 Cape Romanzoff, Alaska

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................2.11 Jackson, Tenn.

ON THIS DATE....... Since Hawaii has a tropical climate, it is often mistaken that its temperatures soar well into triple digits. In fact, the surrounding water keeps Hawaii's climate moderate throughout most of the year. The hottest temperature ever recorded for the state of Hawaii was 100 degrees at Pahala on this date in 1931.

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE