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Showers and thunderstorms developed over the Mid-Mississippi River Valley and moved into the Ohio Valley and Great Lakes on Friday.

A strong low pressure system continued spinning over the northern Plains, allowing for warm and humid air from the Gulf of Mexico to linger over the Plains. This allowed for severe thunderstorms to develop over Missouri and Oklahoma.

By midday on Friday, tornadoes have not yet developed but remained likely for the region. Large hail, damaging winds and violent tornadoes were expected to develop from central Oklahoma through southeastern Kansas and into southern Missouri in the afternoon and evening hours. Large hail was reported in Jefferson City, Missouri with strong winds up to 60 mph reported across most of central Missouri.

Rainfall totals over the region ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 inches. This allowed for flooding to become a concern for the lower Ohio River Valley through the Mid-Mississippi River Valley. Flash flood advisories have been issued from Oklahoma through Missouri and most of Illinois.

The northern side of this system allowed for widespread rain showers to continue across Montana and the Dakotas on Friday. While midday rainfall totals varied from a half of an inch to an inch, the region has seen wet weather for the past few days in a row now. Thus, flooding remains a concern for eastern Montana as well as western North and South Dakota.

FRIDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................99 Midland Airpark, Texas

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................106 Kingsville NAS, Texas

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................24 Stanley, Idaho

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................12 Monarch Pass, Colo.

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................66 Monarch Pass, Colo.

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................5.09 Batesville, Ark.

ON THIS DATE:

The Johnstown Flood occurred on this date in 1889 in Pennsylvania, marking the worst flood tragedy in U.S. history. The South Fork Dam gave way due to heavy rain, causing a 30-foot wall of water to rush downstream through the Conemaugh (KAHN'-uh-mah) Valley. This diaster took 2,100 lives.

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