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Heavy rainfall continued across the Southeast on Sunday.

An area of low pressure located near the Central Gulf Coast, along a frontal boundary extending from the Central Gulf Coast through the southeastern corner of the nation ushered ample moisture northward. Heavy rainfall developed near the Mississippi coast into Alabama, while a few rotating thunderstorms were observed near the coast and offshore though the morning.


Strong thunderstorm activity weakened by the afternoon, and left only isolated chances of marginally damaging wind gusts across southern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle/southwestern Georgia. Rain totals along the Central Gulf Coast have ranged up to 3 to 4 inches during the afternoon, maintaining dangerous flood conditions.


Flood and flash flood advisories and warnings continued for panhandle of Florida through Alabama coastal areas. Outside of this area, scattered showers and chances of thunderstorms continued through the Tennessee Valley into the southeastern Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic.

Meanwhile in the North, a cold front moved eastward across the north-central U.S. on Sunday and brought chances of showers and thunderstorms to the Northern Plains. Parts of the Northern Plains were at slight risk of severe thunderstorm development through the afternoon and evening with chances of damaging wind and hail.

In the West, monsoonal moisture lingering over the Four Corners maintained chances of afternoon and evening shower and thunderstorm activity.

SUNDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................108 Phoenix, Ariz.

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................108 Ft. Stewart, Ga.

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................35 Stanley, Idaho

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................29 Barrow, Alaska

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................56 False Pass, Alaska

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................3.69 Mobile Downtown, Ala.

ON THIS DATE....... It is not unusual for remnants of a tropical storm system to move over Southern California, bringing high humidity and possible lightning. On this date in 1906 however, an actual tropical storm moved up the Gulf of California, pouring 5.66 inches of rain on Needles, Calif. This rainfall amount is twice the city's annual average.