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Wet weather continued to pound the Great Basin and Southwest today, while excess heat warnings were issued along the eastern Midwest. Thunderstorms remained stalled along the western Gulf of Mexico, as well as the Florida coast.

More thunderstorms swept through the Southwest and Great Basin earlier today, dampening an already saturated area and triggering more flash floods across the region. Flood warnings were issued in New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Arizona this morning as a result of persistent thunderstorm activity.

Localized rivers and streams were much more vulnerable to precipitation compared to normal situations as thunderstorms have persisted for several days. Meanwhile, the majority of the West Coast experienced warm, dry conditions as high pressure continued to dominate the area.

The Midwest recorded very warm conditions earlier today, sparking excess heat warning advisories. Temperatures exceeded 100 degrees across the eastern Midwest, while the bulk of the area observed temperatures above 85 degrees. Strong thunderstorms were also observed in northwest Tennessee, while parts of the Texas coast also experienced spotty thunderstorms.

The Northeast experienced spotty showers and thunderstorms earlier today, while temperatures remained in the 60s and 70. The Southeast recorded temperatures in the 80s and 90s, while parts of Florida experienced spotty thunderstorms.

TUESDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

-HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................99 Jonesboro, Ark.

-HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................109 Millington, Tenn.

-LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................28 West Yellowstone, Mont.

-LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................21 Deadhorse, Alaska

-HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................71 Maxwell AFB, Ala.

-HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................1.53 Socorro, N.M.

ON THIS DATE:

-In 1780, a slow-moving hurricane decimated Barbados, killing 4,326. Over the next week, the catastrophic storm system moved on to Martinique (9,000 dead) and St. Eustatius (4,000-5,000). The unprecedented Great Hurricane of 1780 remains the deadliest Atlantic hurricane on record.

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