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CLEVELAND -- A southern Ohio teacher is the latest victim of a phenomenon known as "revenge porn."

The woman, who taught at a Christian school in Cincinnati, resigned last week after explicit photos of her appeared on a shaming website.

The woman says her cell phone, containing the photos, was stolen.

What happened to her is increasingly happening to others across the country who find their private photos posted on websites created for the sole purpose of humiliation.

"He was just very nice and honest with me. He talked to me a lot. He understood me," Stephanie Zogrephos recalls of the young man she dated a few years ago while in high school.

He was a charmer she says, and she admits to liking him very much. She thought he liked her too.

But as most teenage romances go, it burned hot and then fizzled.

A few years had passed when Stephanie received a message from a friend.

Naked pictures of Stephanie had been posted online. She knew immediately who did it.

"He sent them to all his friends on the Internet and then sent them to all of my ex-boyfriend's friends in high school, who were all my friends as well," Stephanie says.

She now knows she was the victim of revenge porn.

In her case, the pictures were posted on Facebook and emailed directly to friends.

In the case of the Cincinnati teacher, her photos were posted on a revenge porn websites.

The sites not only humiliate the victims but can also endanger them. That's because many post names, addresses and even phone numbers of the people featured in the explicit photos.

"You feel helpless. Hopeless," says Holly Jacobs.

The Florida woman took action after she became the victim of revenge porn several years ago.

Jacobs had a long distance relationship with a man.

After they broke up, she says he posted intimate photos in an attempt to humiliate her.

"My search results were horrific. My pictures and explicit video of me were up on over 200 websites," Jacobs says. She filed charges against the man, but they were later dropped for lack of evidence, according to prosecutors.

Long before a legal decision, Jacobs foundedEnd Revenge Porn to spark activism for victims with the goal of criminalizing revenge porn in the United States.

Currently, there is little law enforcement can do in cases of revenge porn.

But two states, New Jersey and California, have passed laws offering protection or recourse to victims.

New York and Maryland are considering similar bans.

Relatives of the Cincinnati teacher say they have reached out to state lawmakers, hoping Ohio will follow suit, and criminalize revenge porn. So far though, no lawmaker has stepped forward to take the lead.

Free speech advocates have already expressed concern over revenge porn laws on First Amendment grounds. The American Civil Liberties Union has defended revenge porn as constitutionally protected speech as long as the images do not run afoul of criminal laws such as child pornography and stalking laws.

A San Diego man, who allegedly ran the revenge porn website that posted the Cincinnati teacher's photo has been arrested.

Police say Kevin Christopher Bollaert posted more than 10,000 sexually explicit photos so he could then use a second site to extort victims for as much as $350 each to remove the photos.

Bollaert is charged with 31 felony counts of conspiracy, identity theft and extortion according to California's attorney general.

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