The brick grandstand wall still stands along E. 66th Street, but now its interior features vibrant artwork honoring the greats who played there.

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CLEVELAND -- A $6.3 million restoration project has brought League Park back to its former glory.

The re-dedication took place at 1 p.m. today, with Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown and former Indians Andre Thornton and Travis Hafner in attendance.

In addition to re-dedicating the park, there was the unveiling of a statue of the late Cleveland City Councilwoman Fannie Lewis, who championed the League Park project until her death in 2008.

The brick grandstand wall still stands along E. 66th Street, but now its interior features vibrant artwork honoring the greats who played there.

And beyond the first-base line, a brand-new building holds bathrooms, concessions and space for a shop or conference area.

RELATED : Cleveland's League Park ready for a comeback

League Field first opened in 1891 at the corner of East 66th Street and Lexington Avenue. Babe Ruth actually hit his 500th home run there in 1929.

It was the home of the Cleveland Indians from 1901 until 1946.

Fun Facts about League Park

  • It opened May 1, 1891 with a game pitched by Cy Young for the Cleveland Spiders in a win over the Cincinnati Redlegs
  • League Park housed the 1920 World Series, which featured the first unassisted triple play in Major League Baseball history.
  • It was the site of Bob Feller's first start in 1936 when the 17-year-old Iowa farm boy struck out 15 St. Louis Browns.
  • It housed the 1945 Negro League World Series, which was won by the Cleveland Buckeyes
  • It housed Addie Joss' 1908 perfect game.
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