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Liz Haggerty's car problems began with the GM ignition recall.

"I called GM last week to kind of complain about it because I have two kids and I felt unsafe putting my kids in the car," Haggerty explained.

She then brought her car to Ron Marhoffer Chevrolet in Stow for service just before Monday's severe storms.

"I contacted them here Tuesday morning and found out that my car was one of the ones that flooded," she said.

Haggerty later discovered several feet of flash flood water had seeped into her Chevy while it was parked in the dealer's service lot.

The dealership owner estimates nearly 70 cars were damaged by severe flooding this week, with 20-30 of those cars belonging to people like Haggerty who had brought their cars in for repair.

Haggerty assumed the dealership's insurance would cover the costs of the damage, but later learned the fine print on a document she and others signed says otherwise.

In fact it is standard procedure for dealerships to make car owners sign a disclaimer, essentially removing them from any liability.

"They make sure that their cars are covered but what about the people who leave their cars with them and trust them with them," Haggerty questioned.

"I think they should take responsibility and help people."

With two kids and no job she now worries about how much her personal insurance will cover and how she'll be able to get around to critical doctor's appointments for her son.

"My son is disabled…he's got a bunch of medical issues so he sees specialists at children's hospital," Haggerty further explained. " I'm not saying I want a car for free but you think that they could help people to get another car."

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