Now climbers are part of a recovery mission, and the future of the ascent is unknown.

60 6 LINKEDIN 1 COMMENTMORE

CLEVELAND -- Kara Stinson of Bay Village is one of more than 300 climbers on Mt. Everest now witnessing the worst disaster ever on the mountain.

Stinson has climbed six of the seven summits and was prepared to attempt Everest when the avalanche hit Friday morning. She had no idea how her training would prepare her for this.

"I've learned how to handle adversity, how to be calm in situations where tragic things are happening. I've learned patience, how to be comfortable and content when things are out of my control," Stinson says.

Twelve Nepalese Sherpas were killed and four other guides are still missing. Several others were injured. The guides were securing ropes and preparing camps at higher altitudes to have them ready for the climbers' arrival.

Stinson made it halfway through the Khumbu Icefall, where the avalanche happened hours earlier and was preparing for the trek to Camp 1, but the disaster has blocked the route. She was in her tent at base camp when she heard the news. Now climbers are part of a recovery mission, and the future of the ascent is unknown.

Read or Share this story: http://on.wkyc.com/1jghDDj