The unusually cold winter has littered city streets with some of the worst potholes that drivers and the city can remember

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CLEVELAND -- The city of Cleveland has a killer in custody -- but not the kind you might think.

This one is a machine that's actually helping the community.

It's called "Pothole Killers."

If you drive, you know that the potholes are huge, sometimes unavoidable and so deep you can see the original cobblestone and streetcar tracks.

"They're not potholes, they're ditches," one driver said with a smile.

The unusually cold winter has littered city streets with some of the worst potholes that drivers and the city can remember.

"This winter has been amazing, as far as how bad the potholes are, not just the number of potholes but the deepness of them," said Michael Cox, director of Public Works for the city of Cleveland.

The city has hired an outside company called Pothole Killers to help.

The self contained truck works by filling each hole with a mixture of asphalt and gravel to make a permanent patch.

"We are measuring to see how much they can get done in a day so we can figure out how long it will take them to get through some of these streets we have," said Cox.

On an average day, the Pothole killer can lay down up to 12 tons of asphalt -- compared to the city's eight tons.

The city estimates that it could take about two months for the machine to reach all the streets in need.

It's a relief to drivers whose cars can't handle anymore damage from hitting potholes.

"My front end is messed up. When I'm driving it goes 'eek,' strange noises, you know, so it's really kind of embarrassing," said one driver.

Even with the machine, city crews are still working on the potholes.

They're using what are called hot and cold patches.

They're not permanent, but they do help soften the impact when you hit a pothole.

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