Thunderstorms over Great Basin, Southwest, Intermountain West

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

A trough of low pressure creeping eastward over the Great Basin and the central Rockies connected with monsoonal moisture to produce widespread thunderstorms over the Great Basin, the Southwest and the Intermountain West today.

Severe thunderstorm warnings were issued in western Arizona as strong to severe thunderstorms affected the Desert Southwest. Flash flood warnings and watches were also draped across the Four Corners due to heavy rain over the region.

Denver, Colorado reported a midday total of 1.30 inches of rain. Rifle, Colorado recorded wind speeds of 50 mph. The West Coast stayed mostly clear of precipitation due to a persistent ridge of high pressure over the eastern Pacific.

Meanwhile, a cold front extended across the central Plains, the middle Mississippi Valley, the upper Midwest and the central Great Lakes. Several clusters of thunderstorms developed along this frontal boundary, as severe thunderstorm warnings were issued in northern Indiana and southern Michigan.

Valparaiso, Indiana reported a midday total of 1.77 inches of rain. York, Iowa, reported a midday total of 4.03 inches.

To the south, a disturbance over the northern Gulf of Mexico triggered stormy weather across the central Gulf Coast. High pressure kept conditions mostly clear across the Eastern Seaboard.

TUESDAY'S WEATHER EXTREMES:

-HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).........................100 McGregor, Texas

-HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)..........................109 Shawnee, Oklahoma

-LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)..........................32 West Yellowstone, Montana

-LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)...........................26 Barrow, Alaska

-HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH).................................53 Lincoln, Nebraska

-HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..........................4.03 York, Iowa

ON THIS DATE:

-In 1883, the East Indies volcano Krakatoa exploded, and it could be heard 2,500 miles away. The air wave from the explosion was recorded by every barograph in the world. The biggest effect of this event was that the global temperature was lowered by 1 degree over the next two years due to the airborne ash from the explosion.

LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE
Read or Share this story: http://on.wkyc.com/1tGYwZO