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Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine explains receiving positive coronavirus result before testing negative

At his press briefing on Friday, Ohio Governor Mike DeWine discussed testing positive for the coronavirus before later testing negative.

The majority of Ohio Governor Mike DeWine's press briefing on Friday focused on one specific potential coronavirus (COVID-19) patient: himself.

RELATED: More coronavirus coverage from WKYC

After initially testing positive for the coronavirus after undergoing a rapid test as a part of the protocol to greet President Donald J. Trump upon his arrival in Cleveland, DeWine later tested negative after undergoing a second more standard test in Columbus. Out of an abundance of caution, the 73-year-old DeWine -- who is not showing any symptoms of the coronavirus -- will undergo a third test.

On Friday, he explained the events of Thursday and what's ahead.

"Yesterday was kind of a crazy day," DeWine admitted as he kicked of Friday's briefing. "It was kind of a rollercoaster day. As I communicated last night, we started [in Cedarville], went to Cleveland, went to Case [Western Reserve University] to get a test set up by the White House. Left and went to the airport fully expecting to see the president. I did not have that opportunity because they told me that I couldn't see the president and the reason was that I tested positive. So that was quite a big shock.

"I came back and got a test. I talked to Dr. Andy Thomas at Ohio State who I have had on here before. He's helped us throughout the pandemic in dealing with the coronavirus. So I called him, we set up a test and Fran [DeWine] and I and some of the people who work with me every day... and we took the test and then we went home. We came back here to Cedarville and just waited."

When DeWine did get the call regarding his second test, the results were negative and negative again after being run a second time. As Dr. Peter Mohler from the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center explained, the first test DeWine underwent was an antigen test, while the second was a PCR test, which is considered the gold standard in coronavirus testing in terms of accuracy.

Dr. Mohler compared the difference between the two tests to the difference between a high powered telescope and a pair of binoculars. While DeWine's initial positive test raised concern regarding the accuracy of coronavirus results, Dr. Mohler said that 90 percent of the tests that have been performed in Ohio have been the more accurate PCR tests.