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Oregon doctor's license revoked for refusing to follow COVID guidelines

The doctor disregarded COVID-19 mandates in his clinic, spread misinformation about masks and over-prescribed opioids.

DALLAS, Ore. — Editor's note: The video above is from a KGW Investigation in December.

The Oregon Medical Board has revoked the license of a doctor west of Salem for refusing to follow COVID-19 guidelines in his office, spreading misinformation about masks and over-prescribing opioids.

According to medical board documents, the board also fined Steven Arthur LaTulippe $10,000 on Sept. 2, The Oregonian/OregonLive reported.

LaTulippe sued the medical board in January after his license was suspended for placing patients in danger by disregarding COVID-19 mandates and asking patients to remove their masks.

LaTulippe’s family practice, South View Medical Arts in Dallas, did not properly screen patients and relied on the receptionist’s ability to visually gauge whether visitors were sick, according to the medical board documents.

RELATED: Oregon doctor refuses to wear face coverings during patient care, admits breaking COVID rules

At least 95% of patients did not use masks at the clinic between March and December 2020, LaTulippe told medical board officials.

LaTulippe made bogus claims to patients that masks were ineffective against COVID-19 and could cause carbon dioxide poisoning, according to the medical board.

LaTulippe also made anti-mask comments during a pro-Trump rally in Salem on Nov. 7, 2020. 

“I and my staff, none of us, not once, wore a mask in my clinic,” LaTulippe could be heard saying in a YouTube video posted by the Multnomah County Republican Party. 

“I petition all of you, take off the mask of shame!” LaTulippe told a cheering crowd in the video. 

YouTube has since removed the video for violating its community guidelines.

The medical board additionally found that in at least eight cases, LaTulippe prescribed high doses of opioids to patients who the board believed didn’t need the highly addictive medication, according to documents.

Attempts to contact LaTulippe for comment were not immediately successful.

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