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New survey finds that 64% of Ohio Millennials, Gen Z do not know that 6 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust

50 percent of respondents in Ohio believe that something like the Holocaust could happen again.

OHIO, USA — A nationwide survey released on Wednesday showed the lack of knowledge in history that United States Milennials and Generation Zers have in regards to the Holocaust. 

That particular study found that 63 percent of people born after 1981 did not know that six million Jews were murdered during the Holocaust and 48 percent could not name one of the 40,000 concentration camps from World War II.

According to Gideon Taylor, President of the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany, this is the first-ever 50-state survey on Holocaust knowledge among Millennials and Gen Zers.

"The state-by-state survey consisted of 200 interviews in each state with adults between 18 and 39 years old. Additionally, there were 1,000 interviews nationwide to set a representative sample."

"In regards to Ohio, several specific survey findings are particularly stunning. For instance, while there were more than 40,000 camps and ghettos during World War II, 46 percent of the respondents in Ohio cannot name a single one. Additionally, 64 percent of respondents in Ohio do not know that six million Jews were killed during the Holocaust."

"Other outcomes in Ohio include: 

 • When asked if they had seen Holocaust denial or distortion on social media or elsewhere online, 50 percent of respondents in Ohio say they had, while 41 percent say they had not. 

 • 50 percent of respondents in Ohio believe that something like the Holocaust could happen again.

Credit: AP
People walk behind the writing 'Holocaust' during the international Holocaust remembrance day in the former the Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald near Weimar, Germany, Monday, Jan. 27, 2020. January 27 is the date in 1945 on which the Soviet army liberated the largest Nazi death camp at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Poland, where more than 1 million prisoners were killed. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

• 12 percent of respondents in Ohio think the Jews caused the Holocaust. 

 • 37 percent of respondents cannot identify that the Holocaust was associated with World War II. 

 • 23 percent of respondents in Ohio believe the Holocaust happened but the number of Jews who died has been greatly exaggerated, is a myth and did not happen, or are unsure. 

 • 64 percent of respondents in Ohio believe there is antisemitism in the United States today; 14 percent of respondents believe it is acceptable to hold neo-Nazi views; and, 59 percent say they have seen Nazi symbols in their community and/or on social media platforms in the last five years. 

 • 61 percent of respondents in Ohio report having never visited a Holocaust museum in the United States. 

 • 66 percent of respondents in Ohio believe Holocaust education should be compulsory in school, and 81 percent say it is important to keep teaching about the Holocaust, in part, so that it does not happen again."

Credit: AP
A view inside a prisoner barracks in the former Nazi death camp of Auschwitz Birkenau or Auschwitz II in Oswiecim, Poland, Sunday, Dec. 8, 2019. On Jan. 27, 1945, the Soviet Red Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp in German-occupied Poland. Auschwitz was the largest of the Germans' extermination and death camps and has become a symbol for the terror of the Holocaust. On Monday — 75 years after its liberation — hundreds of survivors from across the world will come back to visit Auschwitz for the official anniversary commemorations. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)