CLEVELAND -- Baldwin Wallace University’s Community Research Institute has produced the first in depth Northeast Ohio poll, which demonstrates a deep divide in the perceptions of public safety, along racial lines.

Channel 3 was the first news outlet to get a look at the study's results.

The study found residents of Cleveland have much less confidence in the ability of the police to protect people in their neighborhood. They were twice as likely to believe that police treat different groups differently.

The study uses data from people living in Cuyahoga County and six other surrounding counties.

Using data gathered from questions asked online, the sample matches the demographic makeup of our community. However, researchers took extra care to ‘over-sample’ Black and Latino respondents.

The study examined the attitudes of residents in a seven-county area on neighborhood safety, confidence in police and racial tension.  
The study examined the attitudes of residents in a seven-county area on neighborhood safety, confidence in police and racial tension.  

When police stop someone, perceptions of treatment vary by group.

Seventy-two percent of people who'd been stopped by police said they were treated "reasonably well" or "very well."

Those who reported "poor" treatment are more likely to be male, live in Cleveland, be minority, and are younger.

Researchers didn't ask about Tamir Rice or the now infamous Cleveland police chase, but they did ask about whether the killing of unarmed Black men in places like Ferguson, Mo., and New York City are isolated or part of a larger problem.

Researchers found those who did believe these incidents mean something more, tended to be better educated, minority and more politically liberal. This is one of the few times in the study that, political views were found to be a factor.

People who live in Cleveland were 100 percent more likely to believe that police act differently towards different groups of people.

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<p>Protests in Cleveland</p>

From a broader perspective, people surveyed in northeast Ohio were pessimistic about the prospect of the U.S. healing its racial divide, with nearly two-thirds agreeing with the statement: "Relations between blacks and whites will always be a problem" in America."

Those who thought the problems would never go away tended to be minority, younger and better educated.

The data underlies many of the challenges, facing police and the community in bridging a chasm.

The study examined the attitudes of residents in a seven-county area on neighborhood safety, confidence in police and racial tension.
The study examined the attitudes of residents in a seven-county area on neighborhood safety, confidence in police and racial tension.

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(Editorial note: Baldwin Wallace researchers used the term non-white in place of minority in the study.)

READ: Complete study

FIRST LOOK: BW study reveals NE Ohio racial divide on police, public safety