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Who is on the jury for the Kim Potter trial?

The 12-person jury will decide if Kim Potter is guilty of two manslaughter charges in the killing of Daunte Wright in Brooklyn Center earlier this year

MINNEAPOLIS — The manslaughter trial of Kim Potter is in the hands of the jury, after her defense attorneys and the prosecution finished closing arguments on Monday, Dec. 20.

As of Thursday morning, December 23, there is no verdict as the jury conducts day three of deliberations. 

While the trial was livestreamed to the world, the faces and names of the men and women deciding Potter's verdict in the killing of Daunte Wright remain unknown to the general public.

We do have some detail from the jury selection process, such as demographics and political leanings, that give us insight into how jurors may be approaching deliberations.

Here is what we know so far.

Juror #1

The first juror selected in the case is a white male in his 50s. He was the second prospective juror interviewed by the attorneys and Judge Regina Chu. 

In his questionnaire, he stated his opinions on Kim Potter and Daunte Wright were both "neutral."

This juror told Potter's defense attorneys he knew about the shooting and discussed it with friends. He told the court he doesn't believe the criminal justice system works equally for everyone.

During questioning, the panelist revealed that he has a B.A. and Masters in English and works as an editor in neurology dealing with medical evidence.

When questioned by state prosecutors, juror #1 revealed he didn't agree with messages that support defunding the police, and supports police work that's considered good. 

Juror #2

The second juror selected in the trial is a white woman in her 60s. She was the sixth prospective juror interviewed by the attorneys and Judge Chu.

Juror #2 told the court she has anti-gun views and is a teacher. The juror reiterated that she would be an impartial juror and take the evidence presented by both sides into consideration, including the testimony of Potter. However, she said she’s concerned about seeing graphic images and videos during the trial.

Juror #3

The third juror selected in the Potter trial was a 29-year-old white man. He was the seventh juror interviewed by the court and is an operations manager for a retail company. 

This juror told Judge Chu he's seen the video of the Daunte Wright shooting several times, but is open to receiving new information while under "a new light."

He revealed to the court he took firearms training when he was between 12 and 14 years old. He owned a stun gun several years ago while traveling with a rock band but doesn't own one currently. 

Though he said he would contact police if he needed help, he added he's slightly distrustful of police officers. 

Juror #4 

The fourth juror selected in the Potter trial is an Asian woman in her 40s. She was the eleventh prospective juror interviewed by the attorneys. 

This juror told the court a close friend of hers was the victim of a fatal stabbing in Minneapolis five years ago. Despite this interaction with a fatal crime, she told Judge Chu she would be fair and impartial when sitting on the jury.

She works in Minneapolis, and told defense attorney Earl Gray she was a "rule follower" and was willing to serve on the jury. 

The juror told the prosecution she heard bullets outside from her home during the unrest in Minneapolis last year following the murder of George Floyd. She added she did not associate any specific group with the violence and believes police are there to keep order.

She added to the prosecution that its possible to have respect for law enforcement and still hear evidence about an officer's conduct on the field while serving on the trial.

Juror #5

The fifth juror selected in the Potter trial is a white woman in her 20s. She was the seventeenth prospective juror interviewed in the process. 

She told the court she just graduated from college and is working full time. 

The juror said she believes police officers will always be needed as "bad things happen."

Juror #6

The sixth juror selected in the Potter trial was a Black woman in her 30s. She was the nineteenth prospective juror interviewed in the selection process. She testified that she saw the video of Daunte Wright's killing about four or five times on the news. She later added that she didn't watch the video online or search for case details.

She called the video "chaotic" and witnessed the damage and unrest in the area where she lived. 

The juror revealed she owns a Taser and carries it for protection, but said she's never used it. She also has a permit to carry a gun.

Juror #7 

The seventh juror selected in the Potter trial was a white man in his 40s. He was the twenty-first prospective juror interviewed in the jury selection. He is a married father with young children. 

He's served on a jury before, testifying he heard a criminal case about protesters trespassing about 10 years prior.

He told defense attorneys that he viewed the video of Daunte Wright's death multiple times but stopped reading about the case once he realized he was summoned to jury duty.

This juror told the defense his views towards the blue lives matter movement was "neutral."

Juror #8

The eighth juror selected in the Potter trial is a white male in his 60s. He was the twenty-second prospective juror interviewed during the selection process. 

He testified to working as a registered nurse for more than 25 years. He told Judge Chu his wife used to work for the public defender's office in Hennepin County decades ago, but said it wouldn't inhibit his ability to be fair if he were selected.

The juror told the court he viewed the video of Daunte Wright being killed when it was first released, but hasn't viewed it recently. He told the court that police make him feel safe and police departments are necessary.

During questioning with the prosecution, the juror said he owns a gun for duck hunting and considers himself as a responsible gun owner.

Juror #9

The ninth juror selected in the Potter trial was an Asian woman in her 20s. She was the twenty-sixth prospective juror interviewed during jury selection.

She told the court she worked at a location that was damaged during protests, which made her angry and upset.

This juror did not want to serve on the jury, but said she was willing to do so because of her civic duty. She added that there were final exams and job interviews interfering with her schedule and the trial.

She told the prosecution she had concerns this trial would impact her personal relationships, but was selected as a juror in this case regardless.

Juror #10

The tenth juror selected in the trial is a white man in his 40s. He was the fortieth prospective juror interviewed during jury selection.

He is a father who has worked with IT for more than 20 years. Revealing he had interactions with police in high school, he originally wanted to go to school to be a police officer. 

He didn't end up going into law enforcement because he was afraid to shoot is gun. 

Despite his experiences, he told the defense attorney's he would be able to give Kim Potter a "fair shake" in this trial, as defense attorney, Paul Engh, put it. 

Juror #11 

The eleventh juror selected in the Potter trial is a white woman in her 40s. She was the forty-eighth prospective juror interviewed in the selection process.

She grew up on a farm and is a mom to two young children.

This juror told the court she grew up around hunting guns but didn't use them herself. 

While telling the court she's never had any bad interactions with police officers, she said she doesn't necessarily feel safe around them. 

Juror #12

The twelfth juror selected in the Potter trial is a white man in his 50s. He was the fifty-fifth prospective juror interviewed during jury selection. 

He told the court he's a father who currently works for a tech company and previously served in the Navy.

This juror told the court he was Tased as part of his training about 30 years ago. 

When asked about previous police encounters, The juror said his wife and children were carjacked in Minneapolis in 2020. He agreed with the prosecution, calling it a "traumatic" incident.

He added he strongly believes there's a systemic racism problem in the criminal justice system, however, said those beliefs wouldn't have an impact on his work as a juror in the case. 

This juror viewed the video showing Daunte Wright's death one time and has done no other research.

Juror #13, the first alternate

The thirteenth juror selected in this case is a white woman in her 70s. She was the fifty-seventh prospective juror interviewed during selection, and has served on jury duty twice before.

One of those cases involved a police officer, but she couldn't recall to the court if those cases involved civil or criminal cases.

When asked about the protests that followed the killing of Daunte Wright, the juror told the court she thought it was a good time to reflect on the issues that are impacting communities. 

She told the prosecution she generally trusts the police, but there are occasions where people might not be able to trust them. She added she would be 'honored' to serve in this case.

Juror #14, the final alternate

The final juror selected in the trial was the fifty-eighth prospective juror interviewed during jury selection. He's a white man in his 30s and is a father of a young toddler. He said he lives in Eden Prairie. 

This juror told the court his daughter's godfather is a St Paul police officer but added that relationship won't impact his ability to be a fair and impartial juror in this case. 

WATCH: Kim Potter Trial: Deliberations resume as jury struggles:

    

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