LORDSTOWN -- General Motors has plans to shut the doors on its Lordstown plant sometime after March 1, according to reports by The Vindicator and WFMJ.

The Vindicator reports that several plant workers have confirmed the closure after they were informed about it in a Monday morning meeting.

WFMJ says the Lordstown plant had more than 4,500 employees less than two years ago, but that number has since fallen.

Union officials held a news conference on the plant's closure Monday morning:

Union leaders and politicians who are behind a campaign backing the future of the plant say they'll continue trying to convince GM that the plant can be a part of its future.

Ohio's incoming governor, Republican Mike DeWine, says he plans on meeting with GM officials after he takes office in January.

The once-bustling factory already has lost two of its three shifts and 3,000 union jobs since last year.

Earlier today, the Associated Press reported GM is also closing a Canadian plant at the cost of about 2,500 jobs.

A person briefed on the matter told The Associated Press that the plant being shuttered in Canada is just the beginning as GM prepares for the next economic downturn, shifting trade agreements under the Trump administration, and potential tariffs on imported automobiles.

In the fall, the Detroit automaker offered buyouts to 18,000 white collar workers, but it has yet to say how many accepted, or if it's close to meeting the staff reduction goals it set to better withstand leaner times.

The Associated Press later reported that GM plans to slash 14,700 jobs and may close as many as five U.S. factories.

The Chevrolet Cruze is currently built at the Lordstown location.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.