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No, none of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contain a live virus that can be transmitted

A private school in Florida sent a letter to parents, saying the vaccine contains a live virus that can be transmitted.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Centner Academy, a private school in Miami asked parents to keep their kids home for 30 days if their child gets the coronavirus vaccine.

The school is citing claims about vaccination and shedding, meaning the COVID-19 vaccine contains a live virus that can be transmitted after someone gets the shot.

THE QUESTION:

Is there any truth to the vaccine shedding claim for COVID-19?

THE SOURCES:

  • Department of Health and Human Services
  • Dr. Joseph Gastaldo, OhioHealth

WHAT WE FOUND:

The HHS shows the types of vaccines that are approved and how they work.

The COVID-19 vaccines are listed under Messenger RNA vaccines and Viral Vector Vaccines, not live vaccines.

"Unfortunately this business about people shedding the spike protein after they get vaccinated is not only fiction I quantify it as science fiction. They don't shed it in the skin, not urine, it's pure science fiction," Dr. Gastaldo explains.

You can read more about myths and facts when it comes to the COVID-19 vaccine on the CDC website:

THE ANSWER:

No, none of the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. contains a live virus that can be transmitted.

Have a question or claim you want to be verified? Email us at verify@10tv.com.

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